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WHEN IS IT COOKED?

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One of the hardest things in barbecuing is trying to determine when your food is cooked. This generally comes with practice, and adhering to the following:


Know the meat you are cooking (poultry, beef, pork), the cut (brisket, ribs, breast, etc.), thickness, and size.

The temperature of the barbecue should be kept constant for the best results.
Remember that every time you open the lid of your grill or smoker, the internal
temperature will drop. Don't open the lid just to look, open it when you have a reason, such as adding coals, checking temperature, rotating food or mopping If there is a wind blowing, if it is cold, damp or wet you will need to pay more attention to keeping your barbecue temperature consistent.

If your food is getting burnt on the outside but cool on the inside you're grilling, not
barbecuing. Try wrapping it in foil. This will keep the outside from becoming further charred, but allow the inside to cook. This also traps moisture and natural meat juices making for very juicy barbecue

When slow cooking your foods, a "smoke ring" will develop as your meat is being cooked. This smoke ring is commonly red in colour and may be anywhere from 1/8 inch to perhaps inch or more. Don't mistake this for what appears to be uncooked food.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We believe very strongly in using instant read thermometers to tell when your food is cooked. It is safe, easy and foolproof. The modern digital thermometer unit on the right above has a probe connected to it by means of a heatproof flexible cable. You can
position the probe in the food that is being cooked. Connect it to the digital thermometer unit (which sits outside the barbecue), it also has a settable maximum temperature alarm and timer .

Close the lid and monitor the internal temperature of the food without opening the lid. Remember to insert the probe of your thermometer into the thickest part of the meat, staying away from bone since bone gets hotter than the actual meat.


APPROXIMATE GRILL A SMOKER TEMPERATURES

 Type of Cooking  Comments  Temp

Barbecuing

Cooking over many hours 90C to 110C
Low Grilling Good for fish and vegetables and delicate foods 140C to 150C
Roasting Cooking time about 1 to 3 hours little smoke flavour 160C to 170C
Medium Hot Grilling Normal grilling temperature 230C to 260C
Hot Grilling Good for Stakes 290C Plus
 
APPROXIMATE INTERNAL MEAT TEMPERATURES
Food
Doneness  Temp
BBQ Pork
Pork Shoulders
Pork Butts
Sliceable
Sliceable and Pullable
Pullable
83C
87C
89C to 91C
Fish Done Flaking just opaque 54C to 57C
BBQ Beef
Beef Brisket
Well Done 86C to 89C
Beef
Roasts
Steaks
Rere
Medium Rare
Medium
Medium Well
Well Done

49C to 55C
63C to 66C
68C to 71C
73C to 75C
77C to 83C

Chicken Whole
Chicken Breast
Medium
Well Done
72C to 77C
78C to 80C
Duck Well Done 80C
Minced Meat
Beef, Pork or Lamb
Medium
Well Done
72C
78C
Ham fully Cooked
Not fully Cooked
Well Done
Well Done
61C
72C
Lamb Medium Rare
Medium
66C
72C
Pheasant Well Done 75C
Pork
Roasts, Chops
Medium Rare
Medium
72C
78C
Sausage Well Done 78C
Turkey Whole
Breast
Dark meat
Well Done
Medium Rare
Medium
80C
75C
80C
Veal Medium 72C
Venison Medium 72C

 

DISCLAIMER

The Temperatures shown on this web site are the ones used by barbecuers for many years, but are not necessary the ones recommended by the food hygiene authority in the country you live in, please check with your local authority for up to date information .

 

 

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